A human body? We shall do SCIENCE to it!

2010-10-04 19:54

So, Jesse had an appointment with a rehab therapist today.

Background: For the last “few years”, Jesse has been inexplicably sore all over, achey, prone to joints popping and creaking, unable to even just walk around for very long or stand for long without being too sore to stand or even move. Even sitting in regular chairs has been a problem. Or lying down. … You could see how this would get annoying.

So. Rehab therapist asks a ton of questions. What hurts, when does it hurt, what do you do. Starts running Jesse through various things. “Lean forward slowly. Tell me when it starts to hurt.”

And then… Science started happening. If you’ve ever watched a mechanic or a programmer debugging something, you know what I mean. The point at which it goes from just collecting data to a specific theory. Oddly specific requests. Predictions of “this should be a bit of a stabbing pain in your lower back on the right side.”

And then, it turns out, a diagnosis. And once the theory was in place, the doctor had another series of exercises. Move here, push there, bend your knee out while keeping your ankles together…

And bam. Pain gone.

Apparently! It is possible for your hip bones to move against the bone that’s sorta between them. And normally they move just a tiny little bit, and all is well. But they can also rotate. And if one of them gets rotated just a bit forwards, and the other just a bit backwards, and the one that’s rotated forwards can’t move that tiny little bit anymore, you are FUCKED. And not in a good way, mind.

Anyway, there shall be followup visits and explaining of exercises to keep this from recurring, but it looks like the actual culprit for all this agony was a chair with a broken spring on one side. Whoops.

Peter Seebach

---

Comment

  1. I took some kinesiology courses some time ago and worked a bit with it in my own clinic. Most of it was bunk (so I quit again – I’m not a quack) but the anatomical debugging was fun. “So it hurts when you do <something>. Right, that could sit way over here {poke} yes indeed, I’m not a very nice person, now let’s fix it”. More than one client called me an a-hole. I took it as a compliment because they always returned for more.

    — Morten · 2010-10-05 05:22 · #

 
---