But plumbers are EXPENSIVE.

2009-09-07 14:10

Observation: There seems to be a bit of a leak in the downstairs bathroom sink. Turning off the shutoff valves to it stops the leak.

Solution: After experimenting some, determine that the faucet itself has a leak. Remove faucet, replace with standard issue faucet. Faucet no longer leaks.

Observation: The cold water shutoff valve now drips. (I suspect roomie over-opened it, and it was ~30 years old, so it was already on the verge of failure.)

Solution: Obtain replacement shutoff valve. Turn off water main, replace shutoff valve.

Difficulty: The compression rings were pretty much stuck on the tubes. The one on the larger tube came off easily, the other one took a bit of doing.

Observation: The smaller tube side of the shutoff valve now drips.

Solution: Obtain pipe cutter and replacement compression ring, etc., shorten pipe past the area which was noticably scratched and dented.

Problem: The pipe no longer reaches to the shutoff valve.

Solution: Go buy five feet of flexible copper pipe and a replacement for the valve at the OTHER end (the one connected to the sink.)

… So, okay, put the valve on the pipe, run it through the floor, connect everything up.

Observation: Very slight drip on that side of the shutoff valve.

Solution: Another quarter turn.

Total cost: About $80-90 in materials plus about two hours’ time. (I’m not even including the saga of the silicone caulk, the search for a reamer, or some of the other side quests.)

… But at least I didn’t have to call a plumber, right?

Peter Seebach

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